• Overall Rating
Skeena Cat Skiing4.8 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
 
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing
Not many steps to the snowcat each morning!
Not many steps to the snowcat each morning!
Skeena Cat Skiing backcountry base camp
Skeena Cat Skiing backcountry base camp
Plenty of wide open slopes
Plenty of wide open slopes
Skeena Cat Skiing Northern BC
Skeena Cat Skiing Northern BC
Plenty of terrain for fresh tracks
Plenty of terrain for fresh tracks
The top of many of the runs is pitchy
The top of many of the runs is pitchy
Staying at the base camp is very cool!
Staying at the base camp is very cool!
Skeena Cat Skiing Canada
Skeena Cat Skiing Canada
Plenty of beautiful slopes
Plenty of beautiful slopes
Lots of lightly treed terrain
Lots of lightly treed terrain
Skeena SnowCat Skiing Canada
Skeena SnowCat Skiing Canada
The guides are incredibly fun and professional (& enjoy themselves!)
The guides are incredibly fun and professional (& enjoy themselves!)
Skeena Cat Boarding
Skeena Cat Boarding
Skeena Cat Skiing Canada
Skeena Cat Skiing Canada
Powder skiing with Skeena
Powder skiing with Skeena
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing
Skeena Cat Skiing

Skeena Cat Skiing

Skeena Cat Skiing is quickly becoming well known for bringing powder to the people, along with its sister operation and neighbour, Skeena Heli Skiing.

The main difference between heli skiing and cat skiing is just the mode of transport up the hill. Whilst heli skiing may seem a little more glamorous, cat skiing has many advantages (see our overview of cat skiing for more information).

Most importantly, cat skiing offers access to the same gorgeous deep powder, so head out with Skeena Cat Skiing and you’ll be skiing or boarding all the fresh powder you could ever fantasise about.

Base Camp Cat Skiing Packages

Whilst some other multi-day BC cat skiing outfits have luxury backcountry lodges (or somewhat rustic lodges), Skeena Cat Skiing is very unique because the backcountry lodging is at a remote base camp formed with large tents. It is incredibly cool! Open the tent door, step into the powder, and then wander 20 steps to the snowcat.

You may think that staying in tents is roughing it and whilst you won’t get pampered like at a luxury cat ski lodge, there are more creature comforts than you might expect for a camp. It’s not full-on glamping but there are tents with heating and power points, a heated shower block, boot heaters, nice meals, and professional massages on offer. A purr-ffect ending to a day of cat skiing in northern BC! Check out the Skeena Cat Skiing Backcountry Camp packages for more information.

If you are interested in more information or to book, you can make a booking request here.
Skeena Cat Skiing - Backcountry Basecamp DETAILS
BASECAMP CATSKI PACKAGES
Min 3 Days | Lodging in Backcountry Tents
From price based on 3-day/3-night package twin-share.
Base/invoice currency is in CAD ex taxes (5% for Canadians / 2.5% for foreigners).
*Displayed price may vary due to currency fluctuations.
Price p/p
From price based on 3-day/3-night package twin-share.
Base/invoice currency is in CAD ex taxes (5% for Canadians / 2.5% for foreigners).
*Displayed price may vary due to currency fluctuations.
USD 2,146
Ability: Strong Intermediate to Expert
Looking for an amazing powder adventure with a difference? This amazing backcountry base camp package offers incredible snowcat accessed powder skiing with lodging in well equipped tents in the backcountry. Min 3 day package options. More
View inclusions & Add-ons
Inclusions
  • Guided cat skiing (max group of 12 with 2 guides)
  • Double or twin-share backcountry tent-style accommodation with heating
  • Avalanche transciever use & instruction
  • Transport between Smithers airport and backcountry basecamp
  • All meals, snacks and non-alcoholic beverages (buy alcohol as you go) & more....
Add-ons
  • Ski rentals - $30 per day
Location: Canada | Tour Focus: Guided | Terrain Focus: Backcountry
Click here for rates, dates & availability
Future rates & dates are currently not yet available for this operator. Click here to enquire.
You can request a custom tour for your own private group within the date period shown Custom Booking Period
The number of days for this tour can be customised however must be a minimum as shown below Min Days
Please enquire for a price for your custom tour Price
It is not possible to know the exact availability for custom tours so please enquire here and the operator will let you know of their availability. If the availability is flagged as "Filling", "Almost Full", or "Sold Out", it means that dates are filling up or are fully booked. Availability
Jan 16 - Mar 21, 2018
From 3
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Where is Skeena Cat Skiing Located?

The Skeena Cat Skiing is within the Babine Range of the Skeena Mountains in northern British Columbia Canada near Smithers. Smithers is home to the Hudson Bay Mountain Resort where you may want to warm up your legs prior to cat skiing (not open all weekdays).  

Skeena Cat Skiing is part of what the Powderhounds have dubbed the Northern Powder Highway, which is significantly less busy than the (southern) Powder Highway.

The easiest access to Smithers is via 1.5 hour flight from Vancouver. You can check out flight options here. Like other flights on medium size planes, you’ll want to take your boots as carry on luggage. Transport is provided from the Smithers airport (or a hotel in Smithers) to the snowcat staging area with Northwest Truck Rentals, with potential for a quick stop in at Suskwa Lodge (to get rental skis etc).

Suskwa Lodge (on google maps) is located 45 minutes northwest of Smithers near New Hazelton. The backcountry camp is up in the mountains at an elevation of about 1,200 metres and is accessible via heavy duty 4WD and snowcat, a trip that takes about 1.5 hours from Suskwa Lodge.

You can really escape from the hubbub of the world considering the peacefully remote location of Skeena Cat Skiing in northern BC. It may seem a long way to go for cat skiing, but it’s reasonably quick to get to from Vancouver, and you don’t have the expense of a rental car. Compare this to some of the cat ski operations near Meadow Creek where you have to rent a car to drive yourself 5 to 6 hours from a major airport to the lodge.

If you really do love to drive long distances, you can drive to Suska Lodge which is:

  • 432km northwest of Prince George
  • 1,200km north of Vancouver
  • 154km northeast of Terrace (where there’s another regional airport)

Skeena Cat Skiing Snow & Terrain

Skeena Cat Ski Terrain

Skeena Cat Skiing operates on a portion of the second largest heli/cat skiing tenure in North America, so there are plenty of fresh tracks.

The terrain has a range of aspects and there’s plenty of north facing slopes. The terrain includes alpine powder bowls as well as steep open tree skiing. The terrain is diverse so it can cater to strong intermediates, but it’s best for advanced riders as well as expert skiers and boarders who want to play in amongst the crazy cliff lines.

The elevation of the terrain ranges from about 1,760m down to approximately 1,200m or lower when temps are cold. The average vertical drop of the runs is about 1,200 feet (366 metres), with a typical day providing about 10 to 16 runs. Snow conditions and the speed of the group are factors that will dictate the amount of vertical skiing/snowboarding each day.

Each group has an experienced and qualified lead and tail guide, and you only have to share all the untouched snow with a maximum of 11 other guests.

Snow

The Skeena Mountains receive an abundance of snowfall, but even with all that powder an experience with Skeena Cat Skiing will just leave a powder hound panting for more!

The tenure has long been known as a crazy snow belt. The warm most Pacific air collides with the cold dry air from the interior to form perfect snow. The Skeena Mountains are east of the Coastal Mountains so they still get the big volumes of snow, yet the powder is dry relative to that of the Coastal Mountains.

The powder is sometimes bottomless and powder skis heighten the awesome feeling of floating. If you don’t have your own powder skis, Skeena Cat Skiing has a good range available to rent.

SKEENA CAT SKIING INC. ALL-INCLUSIVE PACKAGE TERMS AND CONDITIONS JUNE 1, 2016

GENERAL TERMS & CONDITIONS

All-inclusive packages include airport pick up (evening before first ski date) and delivery back to the Smithers Airport, all meals, snacks and non-alcoholic beverages, lodging at the Suskwa Lodge or at the Backcountry Base Camp, full days of cat skiing, one guide for every 6 guests, use of a transceiver and a transceiver lesson (on first ski date). Packages do NOT include equipment rental, alcoholic beverages, transfers outside of the scheduled pick up and delivery times, travel and cancellation insurance, taxes. In the event of circumstances beyond the control of Skeena Cat Skiing Inc., at the Backcountry Base Camp, Skeena Cat Skiing Inc. reserves the right to deliver the package from the Suskwa Lodge.

REGISTRATION AND PAYMENTS


To secure a booking, the appropriate deposit amount must be received by Skeena Cat Skiing Inc. Deposits are non-refundable, but may be transferred to another person(s). The balance owing is due 90 days before first ski date. If final payment is not received on time, Skeena Cat Skiing Inc. reserves the right to cancel the booking and retain the deposit amount. If booking less than 90 days before first ski date, the full package price is payable to secure the booking.

RELEASE OF LIABILITY

Every guest is required to sign a Release of Liability form before skiing commences. A SAMPLE form is provided on Page 2 of this document. Skeena Cat Skiing Inc. strongly suggests that you read and understand the Release of Liability before you arrive for your cat skiing trip.

CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS

Ski packages are for specific dates and are fully transferrable to another person(s). There are no refunds, either total or partial for any unused services.

Cancellation by guest: If a guest cancels prior to 90 days before the ski date, the deposit amount will be retained by Skeena Cat Skiing Inc. If a guest cancels within 90 days of the ski date, the full amount paid will be retained by Skeena Cat Skiing Inc.

Cancellation by Skeena Cat Skiing Inc.: Skeena Cat Skiing Inc. reserves the right to cancel any cat ski package at it's discretion. In this event, all deposits and payments for the affected ski dates will be forwarded to a later ski date as mutually agreed upon by the guest(s) and Skeena Cat Skiing Inc.

INSURANCE

Skeena Cat Skiing Inc. strongly suggests that guests purchase trip cancellation insurance. See travel insurance options here >>

Powderhounds' Review

Our trip to the backcountry camp of Skeena Cat Skiing was a major highlight of our 2 month recon trip to Canada and Alaska. It was soooo much fun! Skeena Cat Skiing is a far cry from some of those extravagant heli and cat ski operations, where you may feel like you’re sitting around at a posh private school alumni gathering with your blazer and tie on. This is not a refined operation – it’s delightfully raw and wild. Don’t worry - everything’s well organised, incredibly safe and there are adequate creature comforts, but the fun crew are soooo relaxed (lead by owner Jevon who seems to laugh constantly and curse nearly as much!). With the team’s influence and considering the fabulously remote location, it’s impossible not to fully unwind too. I think it’s the most relaxed I’ve felt in a long time!

Of course even though we had an absolutely fabulous time at Skeena Cat Skiing, this adventure may not be ideal for everyone. Our review covers different aspects of their operation so you can determine if Skeena Cat Skiing is likely to align with your priorities. It’s our job to critique even the smallest potential shortcoming and we don’t provide full marks for everything. As a guide to the ratings below, a 5/5 equates to absolutely phenomenal, 4/5 is excellent, whilst 3/5 is still a very good score. You can check out our cat ski ratings to see how Skeena Cat Skiing fares against other mechanized backcountry operations.

Pros
  • Skeena Cat Skiing base camp is an amazingly unique experience. And the camp has adequate heating, amenities and frills that even a soft woman like me was more than happy (ecstatic actually)!
  • Inexpensive relative to other Canada cat skiing with remote lodging (particularly in high season).
  • You don’t need to rent a car.
  • Boutique experience with only a maximum of 12 guests.
  • The service levels are very high and Jevon and all the staff have a very diverse set of skills.
  • Whilst some of the well known BC cat skiing operations are sold out for the following season by March or April, it’s relatively easy to book into Skeena Cat Skiing. The profile of Skeena is likely to increase quickly, so this pro might not last for long!
Cons
  • Despite all the trimmings, it’s still a form of camping and if you’re seeking sophisticated lavish accommodation, then this is not for you.
  • It’s a long trip from the main highway to the base camp in a 4WD and snowcat, but this sort of emphasises how special it is to be completely away from it all.
  • True tree skiing terrain is somewhat limited.
Pro or Con Depending On Your Perspective
  • Not everyone likes to head outside to the outhouse in the middle of the night but if this bothers you, you’ll undoutbedly sort out your own system for this!
Powder Snow
The mountains are well located not too far away from the coast so it gets plenty of precipitation, but far enough away so the quality of the powder isn’t wet. There’s no cited statistic for the amount of snowfall received on average, but it’s a mighty lot. The area is renowned for being in a very reliable snowbelt.

A warm spell had hit all of BC when we visited, and like most BC cat skiing outfits, they don’t have the option of going really high into the alpine to get away from the crusty snow. And Skeena Cat Skiing doesn’t have a lot of tree skiing so there isn’t much terrain that’s protected from the sun and wind. Thankfully it snowed every day whilst we were there, so the snow quality progressively got better and better until it was divine. It wasn’t waist deep but fluffy enough to have a really fun time!
Overall Terrain
The tenure is rather large so the guides have plenty of slopes and aspects to choose from, and to ensure fresh tracks (at least for most of the run). Skeena Cat Skiing has some very impressive terrain, particularly up high where the slopes are delightfully steep without being ridiculously scary.

The usual run length is shorter than some of the other BC cat skiing operators, and is more typical of that of US cat skiing. The cited average vertical drop per run is about 1,200 feet (366 metres), yet our runs were shorter than this (285m on average), probably due to the previous warm temps. Personally I don’t mind short runs, but it contributes to reduced efficiency and less daily vertical which was evident in our daily stats. If you’re one of those folks that seek quantity and not just quality, you might want to go heli skiing or get in very early with one of the big cat ski operations.
Alpine Terrain
Like most cat skiing operations, Skeena doesn’t have true high elevation alpine terrain, but more sub-alpine slopes with smatterings of trees. This terrain is the forte of Skeena Cat Skiing. When I first looked at it, the powder hound in me just started drooling.

Many of the runs started with a lovely steep pitch of medium length before it benched out and the trees thickened a little. Whilst there weren’t really couloirs or the like, or many cliff lines, there’s enough variety for most advanced and expert riders.
Tree Skiing
Tree skiing is a small limitation of Skeena Cat Skiing. Unlike Selkirk Snowcat Skiing that started in 1975 and has had decades to glade the trees, Skeena Cat Skiing is a newbie and will need more time to perfect some of the runs with a chainsaw.

The “tree skiing” where the vegetation was sparse was great, but as we got further down, the trees were very tight and not naturally gladed, and the only egress was via narrow naturally cleared gullies. There definitely wasn’t enough space for fresh tracks for 4 guests let alone 12.

Strong Intermediate Terrain


Skeena Cat Skiing has lots of terrain ideal for intermediates. Particularly if the snowcat did short runs in the mid zones, there are mellow bowls and gentle meadows with only sporadic trees. Ideally you’d need to book your own private cat with other strong intermediate riders, otherwise the expert riders might not be too happy with you!
Advanced Terrain
Skeena Cat Skiing has fantastic advanced terrain with a combination of open steeps, and more mellow meadows and light trees. If the tree skiing was more open lower down, the terrain would score full marks.
Expert & Extreme Terrain
When the snow pack is reasonably stable there are lots of steep pitches for bombing down. It’s not Alaska-type heli skiing terrain though, as it doesn’t have an abundance of cliffs and rock features, but there are plenty of things to huck off and some pillow lines.
Guiding
We felt very confident in the guides’ abilities, and great teamwork was evident between the lead and tail guide. They provided clear and concise instructions, and communicated hazards without over-doing it. For example, they always let us know if we were about to cross a cat track and re-grouped appropriately. There weren’t any powder pigs in our group, but it was still nice that the tail guide provided some direction regarding taking turns.

And whilst not essential to being a great guide, they were loads of fun which added to the stoke levels of everyone!
Cat
The snowcat was pretty impressive and the layout of the cabin was ideal for cat skiing with back steps, all forward facing seats, great views from the top seats, and a very sociable set up. The snowcat cabin fit out is something that will probably evolve with time. There were no hooks, water bottle holders or storage features, so it was hard to leave anything in the cat without it flying around and ending up on the floor on the trip down.
Avalanche Mitigation Strategies
The guides dug various pits and communicated with guests about their decision-making and why we were to ski one aspects versus another. The guides were full time so it was easy for them to know the intricate history of the snowpack during the season, and despite not needing to handover to other guides they were still meticulous with their note taking and meetings.

There aren’t a lot of mechanized backcountry operators in the region to share avo info with, but they communicated well with Skeena Heli regarding conditions and slides.

A radio and backpack with a shovel and probe was provided to some guests, but not all.
Safety Briefing
The safety briefing was efficient and very good but it didn’t cover all aspects that are covered by some other operators, such as shovelling and probing techniques and backcountry hazards such as tree wells. What to do in the event of witnessing an avalanche wasn’t covered particularly well.
Frills
Skeena Cat Skiing provided the essentials but not a fully luxurious experience, which is in line with what we’d expected for this operation. Lunch consisted of a nice roll and fruit, and chocolate bars and muesli bars were available for snacks. There was no hot soup, tea or coffee, and no home made slices or nibbles. Water bottles were provided but a texta to write names on them would have been handy considering they ended up on the floor after every run.

Other frills included a good range of rental skis, transport from the airport, and massage services. An official photography service wasn’t provided, but our tail guide was a professional snowboard photographer and was happy to share some pics with guests.
Accommodation
It’s hard to rate a base camp against some of the luxury backcountry lodges of heli and cat operations that would score full marks. It definitely wasn’t extravagant accommodation, but it was incredibly unique and felt pretty special. Surprisingly there were lots of creature comforts despite it being a camp, such as boot dryers and a massage service. It was also pleasantly surprising to find that not only did the shower have hot water, but the shower building was also heated. Our spacious tent had a proper door and was well insulated and warm.

The food was very nice without being epicurean (the dessserts were particularly yummy!) and there was a small range of alcohol available for purchase (you could also BYO if you had something special you wanted to drink).

The internet service was only intermittent and when it was working it was very very slow – pretty much what you’d expect for being out in the middle of nowhere.

The lodging scores extra points for the high levels of service. The staff all pitched in but the manager in particular was a very busy bee serving drinks, meals, and shovelling snow to make nice paths to the tents and out house.
Value for Money
Similarly, it’s hard to compare value for money for a remote camp versus luxury lodging. It’s obvious that a lot of work goes into forming and maintaining the camp, so it wasn’t surprising that the dirt cheap prices of the 2017 season have been raised a little for 2018. Nevertheless, Skeena still remains one of the least expensive of the Canada cat ski operators with remote lodging during high season.

Other add-ons were inexpensive such as ski rentals and alcohol (and being able to BYO some alcohol certainly keeps costs down).

Notes Regarding Review The review is largely based on our experience, but also on discussions with staff, former guests, and information available on their website. Our review has some limitations as it’s not possible to ski every run and in all possible snow and weather conditions. Every guide is somewhat different and we acknowledge that everyone’s experience will be slightly different. The ratings are from our perspective only. You can also look at the readers’ reviews of Skeena Cat Skiing Base Camp for other perspectives.

Reviews

Way Cool!

POWDERHOUNDS.COM
30/04/2017
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
  • Rider Type
    Skier
  • Rider Age
    36-50
  • Rider Ability
    Expert
Staying at the base camp was very cool Lots of fantastic lines Nice steep lines The tent village Top Dog coming out of the whiteroom
I was looking forward to the challenge of roughing it a bit at Skeena Cat Skiing to try to prove to myself that I wasn’t as unadventurous and soft as I thought I was becoming. I knew that it wasn’t going to be full-on camping in those freezing little tents that seem like they’ll blow away at any minute, or where I’d have to use baby wipes to bathe, and potentially wear the same socks for 4 days. But I still thought it would test me!

I’m not sure if I was disappointed or pleasantly relieved that the backcountry camp wasn’t roughing it at all! Heated tents with proper beds – tick! Hot showers and heated shower room – tick! No squatting to go to the toilet (yes I’m female) – tick! Masseuse – tick! Nice food and plenty of alcohol – had it in spades! Relaxing couches, a fire, fun company, and of course I had fresh socks!

And most importantly I got to do my favourite pastime – cat skiing! I love cat skiing! And getting to take only 20 steps through the fresh powder to the snowcat in the morning, made it even better!

A warm spell had hit all of BC before our arrival but thankfully the snow quality got progressively better each day, with a small to moderate amount of fresh snow everyday. To say that the skiing was lots of fun was an understatement! Many runs started with a very steep open pitch, which petered out to smatterings of trees, and some runs went low down to denser trees where the gullies were the only real exit.

Some pros: unique backcountry lodging (hence the 5/5 rating here); nice steep pitches at the start of many runs; don’t need a rental car to get there; high levels of service (Kevin in particular went above and beyond); fantastic guides; and relatively inexpensive.

Cons: not enough tree skiing and princesses need not apply.

You can check out our more detailed review of Skeena Cat Skiing for more information, and our cat skiing ratings to see how Skeena compares to other operators.

Tremendous experience

Lee Lau
01/04/2017
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
  • Rider Type
    Skier
  • Rider Age
    36-50
  • Rider Ability
    Expert
  • Country
    Canada
Skeena Cat Jevon is the lead guide One of many alpine bowls Fine dinner Fine food
From start of the trip to the end the folks at Skeena Cat have excellent superior customer service. Snow quality was excellent but that is out of the control of operators. What is in their control is delivered with professionalism eg terrain selection, group management, group pace and also last but not least, food, apres-ski and accommodations.

Skeena Cat Skiing

Mark Lawson
17/03/2017
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
  • Rider Type
    Skier
  • Rider Age
    66-75
  • Rider Ability
    Advanced
  • Country
    USA
With little more info than a spare website, a party of seven of us based out of the Denver made the decision to take a leap of faith and book a week straddling February and March 2017 at Skeena Catskiing in New Hazelton, Canada. We decided to go the cat skiing route after realizing that it was considerably less expensive than heli-skiing and more reliable as well, since a cat can go in weather that a helicopter won't go due to visibility and associated risk. The website indicated two options: stay in a lodge or in tents in a camp. Well, we were not interested in sleeping in tents in northern BC!

However, after talking with Lynne at Skeena, we were swayed by her argument that by staying at the camp you are shaving 3 HOURS of daily travel by Suburban and then by snowcat each day. So, done deal - camp it would be.

We flew into Smithers, BC on a Sunday evening. We were met by personnel from Skeena with two Suburbans and a trailer to carry our luggage. After 1 3/4 hours ride with a brief stop at the lodge and another 45 minute snowcat ride on a road only navigable in winter, we arrived at the camp. The camp consists of 6 two person shelters/mini-Quonset huts, a common area Quonset hut where meals are prepared and served and where the skiers and staff hang out, a two-shower building, and a two hole outhouse.

This is not a luxury experience, so if this is what you want, you will not be happy here. There is no tv and very limited internet access. However, if you have a spirit of adventure, enjoy powder skiing with a variety of terrain that includes pistes, meadows, glades, tree-skiing, and gullies that take you to pickup points, seek an intimate after-ski atmosphere with fellow skiers and staff, and excellent food for a reasonable price, this is the place!

The snow quality was very good thanks to the ability of the guides, Isaak and Karla, to know where to find areas of untracked good snow when it had obviously been several days since there had been a snowfall. Fortunately, we then had three days of varying amounts of new snow so that finding pockets of untracked was not an issue.

The accommodations are quite serviceable and warm. I am glad that I brought along a pee bottle which let me avoid having to go outside in the middle of the night to visit outhouse/nature.

I can't over emphasize how much I and our whole group enjoyed every member of the staff. Javon is the owner who had the vision, scoped out the terrain, built the roads, and hired the staff. He is down to earth, direct, competent, and involved in all aspects of the everyday operations. Lynne, his mom, handles all the booking, communications, marketing, and administrative duties. She is as personable, warm, and helpful a person as you will meet anywhere. Kevin , who has been with Javon, from the beginning, does just about everything that needs to be done in the camp. He does it all with an ever present smile and a ready hearty laugh. His music playlist is fabulous. Logan, the cat operator, has an incredibly wry sense of humor for such a young guy. It was eye opening to ride in the cab with Logan and see how skilled he is in continually sculpting the road on his way to each pickup point. Mindy, the chef, prepared great meals - turkey, halibut and shrimp, pork, and beef, rich but light desserts, and after-ski appetizers. Lunch was eaten on the mountain or in the cat. Karla, the tail guide, is also a masseuse - Thai massage. She is a slight gal who may be tougher than nails. She is also a hunting guide in the Yukon in the off-season. Isaak is the lead guide. He's the one who analyzes the snow pack, finds the powder, and leads the way down. He also guides for an Alaska Heli-ski operation.
In summary, the Skeena experience exceeded all our expectations, from skiing to ambience to staff.

3 day package skeena cat skiing

Neil
22/02/2017
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
  • Rider Type
    Skier
  • Rider Age
    36-50
  • Rider Ability
    Expert
  • Country
    USA
We had a great time skiing amazing powder. Great people at the lodge, great guides with excellent driving skills! Had a ton of fun and can only recommend it.
We skied in groups of 9-13 people.

I'll Be Back

John
21/02/2017
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
  • Rider Type
    Skier
  • Rider Age
    51-65
  • Rider Ability
    Expert
  • Country
    Canada
Some of our lines Hard not to have fun!
If you're seeking a remote backcountry alpine experience, surrounded by a tremendous range of outstanding terrain, Skeena Cat Skiing has much to offer. Nestled in a saddle at 5000ft, a 6 minute cat ride from your first run of the day, base camp provides cozy two person accommodation in rigid frame tents and a great atmosphere in which to relax after a day on the slopes. It's hard to imagine this level of comfort in a camp environment. This is my third trip to Skeena and we've had great powder each year. I'll be back!

Skeena Cats is Awesome

Tom Goddard
19/03/2014
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
  • Rider Type
    Skier
  • Rider Age
    36-50
  • Rider Ability
    Expert
Tom Goddard Skeena Review
Skeena was a great time. The snow and terrain were excellent. We had 3 days of blue bird no wind mostly above treeline skiing. It had snowed about 40 cms 5 days prior and by the 3rd day of skiing (snow day +8 days) there were still lots of untracked areas. The lodge and hospitality are very well done. Its not ultra fancy but its well appointed and finished. It's by no means rustic. The guides and hosts mingle well with the guests for a great apres ski evening.

Great snow, great party

Steve Genn
02/04/2013
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
  • Rider Type
    Skier
  • Rider Age
    36-50
  • Rider Ability
    Intermediate
Steve Glenn Review of Skeena Cat Skiing
We knew that the snow on the north coast would be great when we booked a trip with Skeena. Even in BC the snow quality on the north coast is legendary. What we were surprized at was the extremely warm welcome that Lynn and Jevon and Hatha gave to us. Skeena added an extra trip at the end of their season just to accommodate us and filled the extra seats with local skiers (Smithereens and Terracites).

We skied late both days, one day we didn't get back to the lodge until 7:00 pm. The lodge is new and clean, think boutique hostel, and the food was like downtown Vancouver. It's a super easy flight out of Vancouver or Kamloops. We're already planning our trip next year.
Steve Glenn Review of Skeena Cat Skiing

Incredible Terrain, Amazing Time

Jamin Stokes
17/07/2012
  • Recommend
  • Would Revisit
    I've been to several cat operations in BC and, as anyone who has been before knows, it's one of the best ways to ski possible. Last year my group chose Skeena because we couldn't go until late in the season and were hoping to still get some good snow. Skeena is the farthest north of all the cat ops in BC (but still very easy to get to). Needless to say we were not disappointed. We were there the last week they were open and still had incredible conditions.

    My favorite thing about Skeena was the huge lines we were able to get. After riding some of the runs I remember looking back up and thinking "Wow, we really just did that line from a cat?" Truly incredible terrain here. If you're looking for huge lines from a cat this is the place to go.

    The staff and food were very nice and we all got along well. It's a super laid back vibe around the lodge.

    Being their first year in operation not everything was finished in the lodge. This may bother some people who want 5 star accommodations, that's not why I go cat skiing though. If you're there to ski amazing terrain with great hosts and awesome guides, this is the place.